The behind-scenes-blog of Bare Theatre and its affiliates.

Posts tagged “amphitheatre

THIS is why I can’t get any sleep…

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Jeff Buckner and Seth Blum in The Comedy of Errors. Rehearsal photo by Brian Fisher.

THIS.  This is why I can’t get any sleep.

No, not the photo.  It’s the month or two before a show opens up.  The first few weeks aren’t so rough, things seem to go very well and very easy.  Everything is clicking along.  There’s always that honeymoon period where it seems like the show will go off without a hitch.

Then you get to that hump.  It’s usually around the time of getting everyone off script.  I dread this from the actor’s perspective – I hate learning lines and I’m terrible at it.  Blocking does not stay in my head.  So I feel their pain when it’s time to put the book down, but it has to happen.

I get frustrated for them just as I get frustrated myself when I have to get off book.  As director I start to feel it pile up because there’s twenty people trying to remember their lines and their blocking, and did we add them to that scene?  The pace of rehearsals slows.  We simply can’t get through as much as when everyone was reading from their scripts.  Only now they have to start grabbing each other, smacking each other, and fighting with weapons.

It’s at this point in the process that Time turns against us.  Rehearsals fly by, and sometimes we don’t get as far as I’d like.  Sometimes we don’t get to people’s scenes, and they wonder why they were called that night.  With an outdoor show that rehearses outdoors, you lose time when you have to go inside – your building closes a half hour before your outdoor rehearsal would have.

All of that is normal.  This time, we’re adding Circus to the mix.

Don’t get me wrong – I live for rehearsal.  Rehearsal is therapy.  Rehearsal is social time.  Rehearsal is time for honesty with people who won’t judge.  Rehearsal is tradition, it’s ritual, it’s sacrifice (of time and energy), and it cleanses the soul.  I am fully aware of how pompous all of that sounds, but it’s true.

Even during the rough period of getting off book, rehearsal makes me feel whole because I can see the final piece coming together.  Whether it’s by small steps or big steps on a given night, there is always some progress toward showtime.

So even with a thousand details and things I want to work with 20-some actors, I live for it.  But I can’t sleep because I’m thinking about it.  Planning, strategizing, trying to figure out how weather works and if I can predict it or not.  Trying to figure out what certain actors understand and what other don’t based on different backgrounds and experiences.  Trying to remember to email someone about tiny hats, or flags, or what is that shirt made out of, or when can we work that one fight scene?

Last night I really couldn’t sleep because the Circus was coming.

I have to admit that knowing that we would have our first rehearsal actually working circus artists into scenes kept me up.  They have a different process.  They train alone or with tight partnered units usually.  They’re not used to a long rehearsal process because they’re always performing and training.  Would they have patience for our process?  Would they understand what the hell we were saying?  Would they think it was funny?  Would they be bored?  Would they care?

Would it be distracting to have people performing circus stunts onstage while actors are performing the play?

It was the not knowing.  The first-timedness of it all.  The part that excited me so much about undertaking Errors, and the part that I’ve secretly feared this whole time.  We built it up quite a bit, after all!  We’ve almost raised $3,000 in two weeks.  If this didn’t work, where would we be?

Tonight we got our first glimpse.  We got to run a full scene with a snake dancer, a poi spinner, and a fan-dancing bearded lady.  And it exceeded my expectations massively.  We got to talk with aerialists and plan, and imagine.

I now know that it will work.

Circus actually adds to the comedy and the story.  The concept crystalizes.  Ideas that the actors and I would not have had presented themselves easily once circus artists took the stage with us.

The fear is now entirely gone.  But now I’m going to lose sleep because of all the new ideas that are presenting themselves.

– GTB

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A Grand Collaboration.

"The Comedy of Errors" Goes Circus! Check out our Kickstarter here!

Click above to check out our Kickstarter page for this exciting project!

There is already a certain electricity I can feel out at the Stephenson Amphitheatre at Raleigh Little Theatre.  The place has atmosphere, and as more than one cast member has already remarked, it feels like a place in which someone should do Shakespeare.  The stonework walls and benches, the raked wooden stage floor that feels like an old ship run aground…it feels like a set even with no actual set pieces in it.

The open air is inviting.  Now that North Carolina Spring is (finally!) in effect, the warm air and cool breeze makes for perfect weather.  There is a serenity to the place, and a strong sense of time.  The amphitheatre has, after all, been there for over seven decades.

Raleigh Little Theatre is the granddaddy of this collaborative effort.  As one of the oldest community theatres in the nation, they have a ton of history.  Formed during the Great Depression, they’ve seen ups and downs – but they have lasted through good and bad and continued to entertain and educate the Raleigh community for a long time.

A long lifespan by no means indicates that RLT has grown tired.  I have to say that this organization, especially with the new leadership of Executive Director Charles Phaneuf, is doing a great job of producing theatre that attracts and engages its audiences.

By contrast, with only eight full seasons under our belt, Bare Theatre is relatively new.  We don’t have anywhere near the resources of RLT.  We don’t even usually use scenery, much less have a scene shop.  Heck, we don’t even have a theater.  RLT has three!

However, the fact that we don’t have much if any overhead allows us some flexibility and agility.  We can sometimes take some risks.  As much as that can sometimes drive me bonkers, it also provides some freedom for us to dream.

Cirque de Vol is the newest entity in our little trifecta, and they’ve generated a lot of interest in their first year of operation.  The high ceilings of the colorful and welcoming studios downtown have become a sort of home base to a community of circus performers in the Triangle.  Not only does the physical space in the Hue building provide these talented artists with a space to congregate and practice, but they are now instructing a new generation of children and adults in trapeze, aerial silks, acrobatics, lyra, hooping, and yoga (just to name a few).

Sara Phoenix and her sister, Sheryl Howell, have created a strong atmosphere of positivity – it washes over you when you walk through the door.  Sara’s sunny can-do attitude is so reassuring when we talk about things that make me somewhat nervous – aerial silk rigs, trapeze hanging from towers, and flamethrowers shooting fireballs off of said towers.

I’d also like to mention Greg Whitt of Drum for Change, who has agreed to head up our percussion ensemble that will accompany the madness.  Sound has always been important to me in theatre (that’s how I got started with Bare), and drums provide energy and pulse to help keep driving the action.

So here we are.  And we now have a complete cast!  After auditioning via Skype from London, Brian Fisher will now be playing the part of Antipholus of Syracuse, and we are glad to have him.

The pace quickens.  The show gets louder.

-GTB


On tap for 2013…

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Happy New Year!  Hope you kicked off this year of the snake with a bang.

We are gearing up for what will be an ambitious year.  It will involve collaboration with some amazing artists and organizations in the Triangle and it will be a ton of fun.

We will be returning to our roots and mounting TWO Shakespeare productions this year…but first we will explore short works that have not been previously seen in the area.  Our fourth annual installment of Winter One-Acts at Common Ground Theatre runs February 21-24, and it will be funny and creepy!  More on that to come.

This Spring, mistakes will be made.  We perform Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors at Raleigh Little Theatre’s amphitheater May 24 – June 1.  We are looking to collaborate with Cirque De Vol and local circus artists to turn the town of Ephesus into a vintage circus!  Bring a picnic or grab some grub from a tasty food truck and enjoy amazing feats and mistaken identities under the stars!

Bare Theatre is also in talks with Historic Stagville to remount Let Them Be Heard.  If last year you did not get a chance to see this show, taken from the testimony of former slaves in North Carolina, this is a powerful experience not to be missed.  More details will follow.

This Fall, Artistic Director Heather J. Strickland will return from baby-break to direct Shakespeare’s comedy As You Like It at the RLT Amphitheater.  This show is shaping up to be incredible already.  We are partnering with Pinecone – the Piedmont Council of Traditional Music – to create a bluegrass version of the show with live music!

All in all, it’s going to be a good year.  Stay tuned!

-GTB