The behind-scenes-blog of Bare Theatre and its affiliates.

why theatre matters

THIS is why I can’t get any sleep…

600909_447263485363800_1651256418_n

Jeff Buckner and Seth Blum in The Comedy of Errors. Rehearsal photo by Brian Fisher.

THIS.  This is why I can’t get any sleep.

No, not the photo.  It’s the month or two before a show opens up.  The first few weeks aren’t so rough, things seem to go very well and very easy.  Everything is clicking along.  There’s always that honeymoon period where it seems like the show will go off without a hitch.

Then you get to that hump.  It’s usually around the time of getting everyone off script.  I dread this from the actor’s perspective – I hate learning lines and I’m terrible at it.  Blocking does not stay in my head.  So I feel their pain when it’s time to put the book down, but it has to happen.

I get frustrated for them just as I get frustrated myself when I have to get off book.  As director I start to feel it pile up because there’s twenty people trying to remember their lines and their blocking, and did we add them to that scene?  The pace of rehearsals slows.  We simply can’t get through as much as when everyone was reading from their scripts.  Only now they have to start grabbing each other, smacking each other, and fighting with weapons.

It’s at this point in the process that Time turns against us.  Rehearsals fly by, and sometimes we don’t get as far as I’d like.  Sometimes we don’t get to people’s scenes, and they wonder why they were called that night.  With an outdoor show that rehearses outdoors, you lose time when you have to go inside – your building closes a half hour before your outdoor rehearsal would have.

All of that is normal.  This time, we’re adding Circus to the mix.

Don’t get me wrong – I live for rehearsal.  Rehearsal is therapy.  Rehearsal is social time.  Rehearsal is time for honesty with people who won’t judge.  Rehearsal is tradition, it’s ritual, it’s sacrifice (of time and energy), and it cleanses the soul.  I am fully aware of how pompous all of that sounds, but it’s true.

Even during the rough period of getting off book, rehearsal makes me feel whole because I can see the final piece coming together.  Whether it’s by small steps or big steps on a given night, there is always some progress toward showtime.

So even with a thousand details and things I want to work with 20-some actors, I live for it.  But I can’t sleep because I’m thinking about it.  Planning, strategizing, trying to figure out how weather works and if I can predict it or not.  Trying to figure out what certain actors understand and what other don’t based on different backgrounds and experiences.  Trying to remember to email someone about tiny hats, or flags, or what is that shirt made out of, or when can we work that one fight scene?

Last night I really couldn’t sleep because the Circus was coming.

I have to admit that knowing that we would have our first rehearsal actually working circus artists into scenes kept me up.  They have a different process.  They train alone or with tight partnered units usually.  They’re not used to a long rehearsal process because they’re always performing and training.  Would they have patience for our process?  Would they understand what the hell we were saying?  Would they think it was funny?  Would they be bored?  Would they care?

Would it be distracting to have people performing circus stunts onstage while actors are performing the play?

It was the not knowing.  The first-timedness of it all.  The part that excited me so much about undertaking Errors, and the part that I’ve secretly feared this whole time.  We built it up quite a bit, after all!  We’ve almost raised $3,000 in two weeks.  If this didn’t work, where would we be?

Tonight we got our first glimpse.  We got to run a full scene with a snake dancer, a poi spinner, and a fan-dancing bearded lady.  And it exceeded my expectations massively.  We got to talk with aerialists and plan, and imagine.

I now know that it will work.

Circus actually adds to the comedy and the story.  The concept crystalizes.  Ideas that the actors and I would not have had presented themselves easily once circus artists took the stage with us.

The fear is now entirely gone.  But now I’m going to lose sleep because of all the new ideas that are presenting themselves.

– GTB


Bringing People Together With “Errors.”

I’ll start this entry with a disclaimer.  I love Netflix, watch it all the time.  I hardly ever go to the movie theater anymore, and I don’t see nearly as many live shows as I want to.  There, I said it.  I don’t get out enough.

However, I don’t think I’m alone in this respect, and that is a little sad to me.  I think live entertainment used to bring people together more.

Obviously back in Shakespeare’s time people had to see entertainment live because they couldn’t get it any other way.  I think it’s kind of neat to imagine the crowds that gathered at The Globe – up to 3,000 people attending one show.  People from all walks of life, rich and poor, all gathered to see plays that are still being performed today.

the_globe_theatre_by_wolftara-d4rndil

The reconstructed Globe theatre in London.

The actors and the audience members who could afford better admission got sheltered seats with a roof over them.  Those who couldn’t, “the groundlings,” had to stand at the bottom.  If it was raining, they stood watching for about four hours…in the rain.

Not many people would watch a play in the rain today (although Heather did – at The Globe!).  Sure, we don’t have to, but the shift in attitude towards live theatre is pretty striking.

This got me thinking: what events bring people together like this nowadays?  Pop music concerts and sporting events, right?  I once stood in pouring rain with thousands of other people at Raleigh Amphitheater to see Fleet Foxes (totally worth it!), but that’s a pretty rare thing these days.

Could drama bring members of the community in Raleigh and the Triangle together?  I’d like to think so, especially after seeing the crowds at Shakespeare productions at Koka Booth Amphitheatre the last three years.

The folks who built the outdoor stage at Raleigh Little Theatre back in the late 1930’s must have been dreamers.  The formation of RLT and its construction during the depths of the Depression are testaments to the power of people whose imaginations conquered harsh financial and practical realities.  They succeeded in building an amphitheater at one end of the old State Fairgrounds race track – and now that space stands ready for our imaginations.

039-amphitheatre

Raleigh Little Theatre’s Stephenson Amphitheatre when it was first constructed in the late 1930’s. Photo on http://www.raleighlittletheatre.org

My goal is pretty simple.  I want people to give Shakespeare a try because I think many of them will like it, just like we do.  Errors is the shortest play we have from Shakespeare (a mere 1,787 lines compared with Hamlet’s 3,800+ lines).  It is not a heady play by any stretch.  It’s a broad farce with a ridiculous premise (what are the odds of two sets of twins both having the same  name?).  It’s accessible.

Does this mean it’s not worthwhile to perform?  I say no, because it’s still a fun play.  It’s funny today because we all understand the humor.  Errors is a situation comedy and we can all enjoy watching the chaos that unfolds.

With circus added in, I’m hoping to make this more than a play.  I’ll defend spectacle in addition to broad comedy because I think it does have its place.  From what I’ve seen of Cirque de Vol and their surrounding circus collective, these performers are artists and they spend a lot of time working on their craft. What we will create with them over the next two months will hopefully be a fresh and rollicking rendition of this early Shakespeare text.

I’m taking for granted that it will rain at least a couple of the performance nights.  If we can get a night or two without rain, the North Carolina weather in late May should be warm and inviting.  People can bring their children to this show, pack a picnic or grab some concessions or food truck treats.

There will be comedy and there will be spectacle.  Hopefully, this will be a dream that we can share together.

– GTB


Clown Incident.

It was October 31, Halloween.

A woman and some of her employees or coworkers went to lunch at a local restaurant where Matthew Hager, one of our actors from THE LEADER, works.

Being that it was Halloween, the employees of this restaurant had decided to dress up in costumes.  This was fully condoned by the management as a fun way to celebrate the day with patrons.  It just so happened that Matthew decided to dress as a clown.

Matthew Hager sets the table…for comedy! Photo by Diana Cameron McQueen (Dianamcqueen.com).

Matthew played several roles in the show and he also did quite a bit of clown work.  He showed a real aptitude for clowning and he seemed to enjoy it.  He is not only very funny and creative, but he is also able to juggle and has various other talents.

He engaged patrons as a non-verbal clown.  This is not uncommon in the world of clowning, however it is worth noting that this is different from a mime – the clown can make noises, but does not use perceptible language.

Today’s specials.  Photo by Diana Cameron McQueen (Dianamcqueen.com).

Overall, Matthew’s clowning was a hit that day.  He received good tips.

His performance was not mean-spirited and his service did not suffer.  He was able to creatively answer questions about the menu through pantomime and a little assistance from his co-workers, who were happy to participate.

Apparently there was a woman who disliked his avoidance of language so much that she repeatedly called and wrote the management of the restaurant to complain.

Now, in fairness she may have had a bad day that day.  I can appreciate that.  I don’t know what her circumstances were and it could be that she just really was not in the mood.

However, this incident got me thinking about why we need clowns in the world.

It strikes me that this woman’s day might have improved if she had simply joined the others at her table in some laughs and enjoyed the experience.  Certainly this was a story to tell, was it not?

I believe that all of us in this world need not take ourselves so seriously.  We need to laugh once and a while.  We need to be reminded that we all have the right to be silly on occasion.

This was a spontaneous opportunity for the woman and her co-workers/employees to enjoy lunch together, have fun, and share a unique experience that they could not have received in any other restaurant on any other day of the year.  Moments like this do not happen all the time, and I believe any person can benefit from being open to such moments, letting them happen, and taking whatever joy in them we can.  Life is too short to do otherwise, is it not?

Obviously I don’t know all the circumstances of this incident.  It’s not my place to criticize, I simply want to suggest we might all find a little more happiness if we relax a bit and don’t take things quite as seriously.

And please, if you ever see a clown out in public – take a moment to laugh!

-GTB

The clown snaps to attention. Photo by Diana Cameron McQueen (Dianamcqueen.com).