The behind-scenes-blog of Bare Theatre and its affiliates.

Reflections on LET THEM BE HEARD.

I needed a couple weeks after LET THEM BE HEARD to let it all sink in.  This was a huge experience in many ways, and I’m still wrapping my brain around what we managed to accomplish.

It was historic, for starters, and I’m not just referring to the source material.  This was Bare Theatre’s first performance in a historic site, and I believe this was the first time any theatre has been done in the original slave quarters and barn at Historic Stagville.

Not only that, but we think this may have been the first theatrical adaptation of the seven monologues included in LET THEM BE HEARD.  There are others from other states included in the film Unchained Memories, and there have been other theatrical adaptations elsewhere around the country, but we have not found any other record of these narratives being performed anywhere.

The cast of LET THEM BE HEARD warms up just before the show at Historic Stagville

One of our goals was to create awareness of Historic Stagville, and I believe we succeeded.  The site usually has between 300 – 350 visitors for its annual Juneteenth event, a celebration of the day the last slaves were set free.  This year, that day saw 970 visitors.

Among the four audience groups we had that night, there were some 120 people in attendance, meaning we raised over $1,000 for Historic Stagville.   On top of that, our 29 Kickstarter contributors donated $1,301 to Bare Theatre for the creation of LET THEM BE HEARD, so they deserve much credit and many thanks for making this possible.

The publicity the show received was fantastic.  We also need to thank the Durham Herald-Sun (read the article), The State of Things and WUNC 91.5 FM (listen to our interview), as well as The Independent Weekly and Classical Voice of North Carolina (read the review).

All four performances were sold out a couple of days before the event, and we were still receiving calls and emails from folks trying to get tickets.  There have been many requests from those that were not able to see it and many who did see it to bring the show back to Stagville.

These numbers are all important and a great sign of how much this show resonated with the community, but most striking to me was our audiences’ reactions.  I told the cast in advance not to expect applause – not because the show did not deserve it – but because people would simply be unable to applaud at the end.  After such tales of tragedy and suffering, it just didn’t feel right.

Their faces were enough, however.

I saw many people who couldn’t speak afterwards, some choked up by tears, others silently burning with a simmering anger and frustration that such things could have ever happened on these lands and in our community.  That is a testament to the power of the narratives themselves, and of the incredible talent and ability that our cast displayed in order to tell those stories.

We are currently in the process of creating audio recordings of these seven narratives, with the help of Triangle Radio Reading Service, a service for the blind.  The actors have adapted readily to the studio and I am blown away by the recordings so far.

It looks promising for us to return to Stagville, but as yet we do not know exactly when.

It is very important to us to keep working on this project and to continue to tell these stories.  I believe we succeeded in creating a safe environment for actors and audience to come together, and to give people a chance to listen.

There will be more to come on this, I promise.

-GTB

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