The behind-scenes-blog of Bare Theatre and its affiliates.

Discovering a Plantation in Your Backyard.

I was born and raised in Durham, North Carolina.  I went to Durham Academy in elementary school, and later moved and went to public school.  I went to Bulls games as a kid, loved seeing movies at the Carolina Theatre, and I graduated from Northern High School.  I thought I knew pretty much everything there is to know about Durham.

Two years ago I was shocked to learn that Durham has a plantation.

Not only does Durham have a plantation, but it was one of the largest plantations in the South.  At its peak, Stagville had over 900 slaves living and working on site, and it stretched out for miles over most of the area that is now known as Treyburn.

I found out about Stagville because my father became a volunteer at the state historic site two years ago.  When he told me about it, I couldn’t believe it.  He told me about the structures that were still standing, and about the significance Stagville had in the 1800’s.

He gave me a tour of the place and I was amazed.  Not only does the owner’s house remain (it was built in the late 1700’s, pre-Revolution, but there is a family cemetery plot, slave quarters, and a huge handmade barn.  This is a remarkable piece of history that I had no idea existed.

I was surprised and troubled by that.

Here is this incredible cultural resource that can give us insight into what life was like before and during the Civil War, and no one knows about it.  Every Durham native or long-time resident I have talked to about Stagville had the same reaction – no one knew the place existed.

What concerns me is that much of the land that used to be part of the plantation is now divided among many different owners.  There are many cabins and buildings that would have supported such a huge slave population, and these structures are literally disintegrating.  Without care and upkeep, these artifacts are being reclaimed by nature.  They are collapsing and rotting.

I wanted to increase awareness.  If the public knows about Stagville and recognizes its historical significance, we can generate more support and funding to preserve its history.

The obvious choice for me was to create a piece of theatre.  With a live event, we could bring a new audience to Stagville.

I didn’t want to do a story on the slaveowners, however.  While the Bennehans and Camerons who owned the place no doubt have interesting stories, I was more interested in the overwhelming majority of people who lived there – the enslaved community.

Former slave cabin at Historic Stagville, Durham NC. The first part of LET THEM BE HEARD will be staged in quarters like this one.

My father gave me the idea to create a piece based on the Slave Narrative Project, a collection of thousands of interviews the WPA conducted in the 1930’s with men and women who were old enough to remember what life was like under slavery.  I began reading the interviews, and I realized this was a story about slavery and its aftermath that I had never seen or heard before.

Many of the stories are absolutely heartbreaking in their descriptions of cruelty and disregard for humanity.  Some of the stories are touching in the optimism maintained by individuals who faced bleak circumstances.  The Slave Narratives also raise interesting questions about race and the role of government in our lives.

Next Saturday (4/28/12) we hold auditions for this piece, LET THEM BE HEARD.  We are looking for African-American actors who will tell these stories as monologues to be presented in the buildings of Stagville on a lantern-lit evening in June.

AUDITION INFO IS HERE: http://bit.ly/BeHeardAuditions

Please email me (todd@baretheatre.org) if you or anyone you know is interested, and I will get you more information.

-GTB

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